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wreak or reek

'Not with water,' her father continued. wreck [reck] n. something that has been ruined. wreak [reek] v. to bring about, inflict, as in wreak havoc, wreak vengeance. This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. For example, The bride exuded happiness while her ex-boyfriend reeked of jealousy. The noun wreck refers to the remains of something that has been damaged, disabled, or destroyed. So to wreak havoc is to bring about widespread destruction. If they wreak they will at worst be 10-6 or 9-7 and sweating out the tiebreakers. Improve your grammar, vocabulary, and writing -- and it's FREE! Wreak in this sense of 'to bring about, cause' is sometimes confused with wreck, 'to cause the destruction of,' perhaps because the wreaking of damage may leave a wreck. Trying to decipher the difference between the two could wreak havoc on your brain, but we hope that after reading this article, that’s no longer the case! The meaning of “reek” is pretty simple – it indicates that something smells horrible. See more. To give off a strong unpleasant odor: "Grandma, who reeks of face powder and lilac water" (Garrison Keillor). William Goldman: 'You didn't bathe,' her father said. Wreak, a rare verb most common in British English, means to bring about. 'Reek,' he said, 'if it please my lord.'. (Jennifer Egan. You might wreak your anger against Mrs. Talbot by taking the heads off her tulips, or you might wreak your fury at the latest increase in council tax by calling for a public demonstration outside the Council House. As a verb, reek means a few things. Across the wall to the right someone had scrawled, with some type of reddish liquid, the words 'Jim Smith next will die.'" Although “reek” and “wreak” sound alike, they have very different meanings, so using the wrong one could leave your reader confused. It’s related to the Old Norse reka (“to drive, avenge”) and the Gothic wrikan (“to persecute”). Clare Clark: The Captain looked Tom up and down. Chiefly British To smoke, steam, or fume. Two of these commonly confused words are homophones: reek and wreak rhyme with seek. The townspeople have suffered a lot, and the seasonal floods continue to. More homophones . No one will be spared. Reek and Wreak, commonly confused words in the English language. Martin: The guards fell back to a discreet distance. The answer is simple: reek, wreak are homophones of the English language. Or watch more about that strange little phrase “cut off your nose to spite your face” in the video on the differences between spite and despite below. Reeking is a word that usually describes something with a bad smell. See Wiktionary Terms of Use for details. Chiefly British … Someone who wreaks vengeance inflicts punishment on those who hurt them. Reek can be a verb or a noun, and refers to something smelling bad. Here’s an example of reek as a noun: The reek from the dirty laundry was so strong, she could smell it from the hallway. What’s The Difference Between Atheism And Agnosticism? Quotation Marks. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. the lord asked, as they trotted down the broad straight streets of Barrowton.Reek: I'm Reek, it rhymes with wreak. (archaic, literary) Punishment; retribution; payback. To cause, inflict or let out, especially if causing harm or injury. Your email address will not be published. As a verb, wreck means to damage, tear down, or destroy. Wreak is most commonly used in the phrases wreak havoc and wreak vengeance. Wreak is a verb that means “to inflict” or “to carry out.” Manslaughter vs. (Mr. Burns in "Last Exit to Springfield.". If your room is a wreck, clean it up. It is often used in combination with words like “havoc” or “destruction”: The recession is wreaking havoc with house prices. In addition, the noun wreck may refer to a person in poor mental or physical condition. Check your text and writing for style, spelling and grammar problems everywhere on the web. Wreak definition, to inflict or execute (punishment, vengeance, etc. Required fields are marked *. Havoc may reek, and it may cause a wreck, but reek havoc and wreck havoc are nonsensical phrases. The verb wreak means to cause or bring about (harm or havoc) or to inflict (punishment or vengeance). The answer is simple: reek, wreak are homophones of the English language. Copyright by Jane Straus/GrammarBook.com. ''I've been riding all day,' Buttercup explained. Reek means “to smell” or “to smoke.” Wreak means “to bring about,” “to cause,” or “to inflict.” The past tense and past participle of wreak is wreaked. As a verb, wreck means to damage, tear down, or destroy. If you’re trying to figure out which of these words to use, remember: And if you’re feeling uncertain about the “reek” of something “wreaking” havoc with someone’s sense of smell, or have any other concerns about your writing, why not have your document proofread to ensure it’s error free? God only knows how he smelled to the dog who had her nose tucked right into one torn lapel. The noun reek refers to a vapor or fume, or to a strong smell or stench. The past tense of wreak is wreaked, so the past tense of wreak havoc is wreaked … How to use wreak havoc in a sentence. :: verb-intransitive. "The small den was a _____—sofa cushions thrown on the floor, clothing scattered about. Houghton Mifflin: The boy wreaked havoc in the basement by wrecking his castle made of blocks. It’s now more important than ever to develop a powerful writing style.

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